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Penrose Library

Subject Guide - Religion: Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian

Chicago Style

Here are some basic guidelines for Chicago style citations. Turabian style is a condensed version of Chicago specifically created for students. For citations they are nearly identical but the Turabian manual is more approachable. The Chicago Manual of Style has guidance for nearly any situation or source type you are trying to cite.

For in-text references, there are two ways you can cite materials. The first one, notes-bibliography, or notes, style, is mostly used in humanities, and author-date style, is often used in social sciences and natural and physical sciences. 

  • Notes-bibliography style: This style uses subscript notations leading to endnotes or footnotes.

e.g. By 1911, according to one expert, an Amazon was "any woman rebel-which, to a lot of people, meant any girl who left home and went to college."1

For this style the first time you cite a work you will put a full bibliographic citation for the source in the note, though the formatting is slightly different from that in the bibliography. Afterwards you will only have to put an abbreviated version of the citation:

First note citation: Jill Lepore, The Secret History of Wonder Woman (New York: Vintage Books, 2015), 17.

Subsequent citations: Lepore, Wonder Woman, 28-29.

Bibliographic citation: Lepore, Jill. The Secret History of Wonder Woman. New York: Vintage Books, 2015.

  • Author-date style: This style uses a parenthetical citation with (author date, relevant page number).

By 1911, according to one expert, an Amazon was "any woman rebel-which, to a lot of people, meant any girl who left home and went to college" (Lepore 2015, 17).

For the Bibliography it will be in alphabetical order based on author name for either citation style.

Journal article

Format: Lastname, Firstname. "Title of Article: Subtitle of Article." Title of Journal Volume number, Issue Number (Date of Publication): Page Range. URL/DOI if found online.

Note format: Firstname Lastname, "Title of Article: Subtitle of Article," Title of Journal Volume number, Issue Number (Date of Publication): Page Number, URL/DOI if found online.

Example: Van Deusen, Natalie. "'Doubleday Affaren': The Story of Sigrid Undset's Caterina Av Siena." Scandinavian Studies 87, no. 3 (2015): 383-400. 10.5406/scanstud.87.3.0383.

Books

Format: Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book: Subtitle of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher's Name, Date of Publication.

Note format: Firstname Lastname, Title of Book: Subtitle of Book (Place of Publication: Publisher's Name, Date of Publication), page number(s).

Example: Brooks, Gwendolyn. Maud Martha. Chicago: Third World Press, 1993.

Newspaper Article

Format: Lastname, Firstname. "Article title." Newspaper name, date published. URL.

Note format: Firstname Lastname, "Article title," Newspaper name, date published, URL.

Example: Bernton, Hal. "Nagasaki survivor says Hanford neglects bombing's human costs." Seattle Times, March 11, 2018.

Website note: often there will not be an author, in which case you will just use the title in the note, and list it under the title of the website in the bibliography.

Format: Lastname, Firstname OR Website. "Name of Page." Name of section (if relevant). Last modified Month date, year. URL.

Note format: Firstname Lastname, "Name of Page," Name of section (if relevant), Website, Last modified Month date, year, URL.

Example: Google. "Privacy Policy." Privacy & Terms. Last modified March 25, 2016. http://www.google.com/intl/en/privacypolicy.html.

Online Resources

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